Anat Cohen plays Rockland

October 18th, 2013

from jstandard.com

Anat Cohen plays Rockland
By: Abigail Klein Leichman

“I always try to surround myself with music and be part of as many projects as I can,” says award-winning Israeli jazz clarinetist and saxophonist Anat Cohen. She and her eponymous quartet will headline the annual Chazen Jazz Concert at Rockland Community College’s Cultural Arts Center on October 26 at 8 p.m.

Pianist Bruce Barth, guitar player Howard Alden, Joe Martin on bass, and Daniel Freeman on drums will back her. “We’ll have fun,” promises Cohen, whose appearance in Rockland was arranged by special request of sponsors Jerry and Simona Chazen.

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Anat Cohen plays Rockland

October 18th, 2013

from jstandard.com

Anat Cohen plays Rockland
By: Abigail Klein Leichman

“I always try to surround myself with music and be part of as many projects as I can,” says award-winning Israeli jazz clarinetist and saxophonist Anat Cohen. She and her eponymous quartet will headline the annual Chazen Jazz Concert at Rockland Community College’s Cultural Arts Center on October 26 at 8 p.m.

Pianist Bruce Barth, guitar player Howard Alden, Joe Martin on bass, and Daniel Freeman on drums will back her. “We’ll have fun,” promises Cohen, whose appearance in Rockland was arranged by special request of sponsors Jerry and Simona Chazen.

To read the full article click here

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Anat Cohen and guitarist Douglas Lora perform during the Hyde Park Jazz Festival

September 30th, 2013

from chicagotribune.com

Clarinetist Anat Cohen and guitarist Douglas Lora perform during the Hyde Park Jazz Festival at the Rockefeller Chapel on the University of Chicago campus Saturday
By: Howard Reich

Anat Cohen and Douglas Lora Duo at the University of Chicago’s Rockefeller Memorial Chapel. Every great jazz festival needs a world premiere, and the Hyde Park gathering has an unforgettable one in this engagement by Israeli clarinetist Cohen and Brazilian guitarist Lora. Though the two had collaborated before in various settings, this performance marks their first duo concert, and judging by its lyrical urgency and technical finesse, there should be many more to come. Cohen stands as one of the world’s great clarinetists, the rounded beauty of her tone matched by the joyousness of her phrasings. Long a student of choro and other Brazilian idioms, Cohen dispatches its relentless syncopations idiomatically but also brings to bear the soulfulness that marks all her work. She hardly could have a more empathetic partner than Lora, who draws lush harmony and a vast array of colors from his seven-string guitar. A splendid new duo is born.

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Anat Cohen and guitarist Douglas Lora perform during the Hyde Park Jazz Festival

September 30th, 2013

from chicagotribune.com

Clarinetist Anat Cohen and guitarist Douglas Lora perform during the Hyde Park Jazz Festival at the Rockefeller Chapel on the University of Chicago campus Saturday
By: Howard Reich

Anat Cohen and Douglas Lora Duo at the University of Chicago’s Rockefeller Memorial Chapel. Every great jazz festival needs a world premiere, and the Hyde Park gathering has an unforgettable one in this engagement by Israeli clarinetist Cohen and Brazilian guitarist Lora. Though the two had collaborated before in various settings, this performance marks their first duo concert, and judging by its lyrical urgency and technical finesse, there should be many more to come. Cohen stands as one of the world’s great clarinetists, the rounded beauty of her tone matched by the joyousness of her phrasings. Long a student of choro and other Brazilian idioms, Cohen dispatches its relentless syncopations idiomatically but also brings to bear the soulfulness that marks all her work. She hardly could have a more empathetic partner than Lora, who draws lush harmony and a vast array of colors from his seven-string guitar. A splendid new duo is born.

To see the original article click here

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A conversation with clarinetist & saxophonist Anat Cohen

April 19th, 2013

from clevelandclassical.wordpress.com

Preview: Tri-C JazzFest — a conversation with clarinetist & saxophonist Anat Cohen
By: Jarrett Hoffman

As part of Cleveland’s 2013 Tri-C JazzFest, renowned jazz clarinetist and saxophonist Anat Cohen will be performing with the Rimon Jazz Institute Ensemble from Tel Aviv as well as the Tri-C Jazz Studies Workshop Ensemble on April 24 beginning at 7:30 pm in the Tri-C Metro Campus Auditorium. Voted Clarinetist of the Year by the Jazz Journalists Association six years and counting, last September Cohen released her sixth album as a bandleader, Claroscuro, which features her on both clarinet and saxophone. We reached her by telephone to talk about the album and her upcoming performance in Cleveland.

To read the interview click here

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Ms. Cohen on the clarinet was a revelation

May 3rd, 2013

from nytimes.com

Jazz’s Skinny Stepchild
By: Joe Nocera

In search of some live Brazilian music a few months ago, I found my way to Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola, in the Time Warner Center, where the Brazilian percussionist Duduka Da Fonseca was leading a quintet. I can’t say I knew much about Mr. Da Fonseca before I heard his band that night, and among the things I didn’t know was that his quintet’s regular reed player was a 38-year-old Israeli woman named Anat Cohen, who has lived in New York since 1999.

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Mary Lou Williams Women in Jazz Festival begins final year as women-only showcase

May 16th, 2013

washingtonpost.com

Mary Lou Williams Women in Jazz Festival begins final year as women-only showcase

The headline blared: “Why Women Musicians Are Inferior.” It was cringe-inducing even in 1938, when the respected jazz publication DownBeat printed the essay. A rebuttal from a female saxophonist — a “skirt swinger” — was further ridiculed when DownBeat slapped on the title “How Can You Blow a Horn With a Brassiere?”

Two generations passed before female bandleaders, instrumentalists and composers — long ensconced in jazz history but often marginalized or maligned — began being saluted at “women-in-jazz” festivals.

To read the full article click here:http://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/music/mary-lou-williams-women-in-jazz-festival-begins-final-year-as-women-only-showcase/2013/05/15/6a6579ae-b672-11e2-aa9e-a02b765ff0ea_story.html

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Interview: Anat Cohen

June 13th, 2013

from rochestercitynewspaper.com

Interview: Anat Cohen
By: Ron Netsky

When Israeli clarinetist Anat Cohen steps out of her Brooklyn home, she finds herself between two worlds. Cohen resides in Williamsburg, a vital neighborhood in the New York jazz scene. But Williamsburg is also a center of Hasidic Judaism in the United States.

“I live right on the border,” says Cohen. “I make a left turn, I’m in 18th-century Lithuania; if I make a right turn everybody also wears black but they’re more computer hackers and hipsters. One day I feel like making a left and one day I feel like making a right, and I don’t think one is better than the other.”

Born in Israel, Cohen attended a musical conservatory in Tel Aviv along with her two brothers, soprano saxophonist Yuval and trumpeter Avishai, in the late 1980’s. The siblings, who sometimes play and record as the 3 Cohens, also attended a school of the arts.

At that time Israel was not exactly a hotbed of hot jazz. There were only a couple of places in Tel Aviv where you could hear the music. But the Cohens were hooked. “When you go to school with other people who do what you do, your friends become other musicians and you hang out and immerse in it 24/7,” Cohen says.

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Three top clarinetists salute the master, Benny Goodman

June 17th, 2013

from chicagotribune.com

Three top clarinetists salute the master, Benny Goodman
By: Howard Reich

Each of the clarinetists approached this repertoire quite differently, and each illuminated a distinct facet of Goodman’s music. But Cohen surely came closest to evoking the sensuousness of Goodman’s sound, the propulsion of his rhythm and the soaring high spirits of his up-tempo playing.

From Cohen’s first notes in “After You’ve Gone,” it was clear that she understood the essence of Goodman’s clarinet work. The warmth, ripeness and roundness of her tone were pure Goodman, but so was her sense of phrasing and the cry at the center of her sound. A lamenting quality born of the Jewish klezmer tradition influenced Goodman, and Cohen has it inside her horn.

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